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Welcome to the web site of the Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies at the University of Oregon. The Program was established in 1998 as the result of a generous gift from the Harold and Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation of Portland.

The interdisciplinary Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies provides a comprehensive undergraduate curriculum in the history, religion, and civilization of the Jewish people, and offers two years of instruction in Hebrew language and literature. The program offers a Judaic Studies Major leading to a bachelor of arts (B.A.) degree and a Judaic Studies Minor. At this time there are no graduate programs offered through the Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies.

The Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies also offers public lectures, brown bag seminars, and other events of campus wide and community interest.

Find out more about Judaic Studies at the University of Oregon by exploring this web site or feel free to contact the Program Director, Dr. Deborah A. Green, with your individual questions.


Activities

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In Memory of Bill Toll

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I write with the sad news that our colleague and friend, Bill Toll, passed away on December 20th, 2015, the result of heart failure. He was 74. Bill Toll served the history department at the UO and the profession of history for well over forty years. With his expertise in African American history and the history of Jews in America, Bill was able to construct courses with an understanding of race and ethnicity that was vital to his profession as well as our entire community. For Judaic Studies in particular, Bill taught one of our required courses in American

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Healing at Dachau: One Physician’s Reflections on Liberation

Presentation by Clarice Wilsey

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

7:00 pm

Browsing Room, Knight Library

1501 Kincaid St.

David B. Wilsey, M.D. was one of 27 physicians that liberated Dachau Concentration Camp on April 29, 1945. He spent the next 5 plus weeks providing medical care to former prisoners who experienced starvation, typhus, typhoid and malnutrition. He documented his medical and personal thoughts in the many letters he sent home to his wife. To his patients he was a light amidst the evil and cruelty caused by the Nazis.

Clarice Wilsey will read from the letters and describe the work and

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